Don't Forget! Deducting The Business Use of Your Vehicle.

Posted by Michael S. Templeton on Dec 10, 2018 5:33:17 PM

Many of us use our personal vehicle for business purposes to one extent or the other. This doesn't seem fair since the added miles can reduce the value of your vehicle and reduce your equity, not to mention other associated costs you might pay for out of pocket. Because of this, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) allows taxpayers to recover the costs associated with the business use of a vehicle. We'll discuss the two methods of recovering the costs associated with the business use of a vehicle.

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Topics: Tax Deductions, Deducting Business Expenses

Reaping The Tax Benefits of 6 Charitable Contributions This Holiday Season

Posted by Stacey L. Schroeffel, CPA, MST on Nov 26, 2018 9:25:45 PM

Every holiday season we get into the holiday spirit, this means giving not only to our friends and family but to charities as well. Often times these donations are made in a moments notice. This year, however, a little extra planning and organization may help you this upcoming tax season.

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Topics: Charitable Contributions, Tax Deductions

Calculating Fringe Benefits for W-2s.

Posted by Lauri A. Lisanti, CPA, MAcc, CPS, Certified QB ProAdvisor on Nov 12, 2018 3:42:07 PM

The holidays are quickly approaching and the year-end is right around the corner. Before running the last payroll of the year, business owners not only need to make sure they have completed any W-9s for vendors that will be receiving 1099s, as well as make sure that any taxable fringe benefits are included in the owners and employees W-2s. Given the vast number of fringe benefits offered and how they are taxed, it can be confusing determining what is to be included in wages.  

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Topics: Tax, Fringe Benefits

Top 10 Ways Your 2018 Taxes Could Change | A Tax Cut and Jobs Act Overview

Posted by Haylie Parkhill on Oct 29, 2018 5:01:00 PM

In 2017 President Trump signed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.  As a result, there are many changes to the tax code which will affect us this tax season. Now that the 2018 tax year is almost over, you’ll want to start planning how this new tax provision will affect you. Below is a brief run-through of the most critical changes that are effective beginning with your 2018 tax return.  

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Topics: Tax, Tax Filing Requirement Changes

Haven’t Filed Your Tax Return Yet? It’s Time to Request an Extension

Posted by Derek M. Backa, CPA, CVA on Apr 9, 2018 4:04:11 PM

“When it comes to taxes, there are two types of people.  There are those that get it done early, also known as psychopaths, and then the rest of us.” – Jimmy Kimmel

I can’t say that we (CPAs) agree with Jimmy Kimmel’s sentiment that those of you that file early are psychopaths.  I like to think of early filers as our best friends.  Then again, perhaps only psychopaths want to be best friends with their CPA. Maybe Jimmy is onto something after all. Regardless, for those of you who did not file early, there are a few things you should know.

First and foremost, we’ll still be your friend.

Second, if you haven’t filed yet, it’s time to request an extension. 

If your CPA is filing for you, you’ll need to send whatever information you have in ASAP.  Don’t worry if you're missing documents.  

Your CPA will use the information you have available to draft your estimated tax return.  If they’re unable to file your return by the due date (which is highly likely at this stage), they’ll need your permission to request an extension. 

Your CPA needs all the information you have in order to extend your return.  This is because all taxes must be paid with the extension to avoid penalties and interest.  Hence, it’s important that your CPA has the estimated tax return and any estimated liability calculated as accurately as possible with the tax data you have available.

If you’re filing your own return and requesting your own extension.

  1. You'll need to estimate your tax liability and submit your estimated payment by the due date (April 17, 2018). 
    1. You can do this here.

Tips for gathering all that you need to file form 4868 or else have your CPA file it for you:

  • Use an organizer.
    • If you have a CPA filing your return for you, chances are they provided an organizer for you. 
    • If you’re filing your own return you can find an organizer here.
  • Collect all your tax documents in one place, while filling out the organizer try to organize your supporting documents accordingly.  
  • Make a list of any missing documents.  Looking over your return from last year can help you figure out what documents you might be missing.  
  • Keep in mind any major changes you experienced throughout the year (i.e. if you moved, had a child, got divorced, sold some stock, etc). 
  • The more organized you are the easier it will be and the less likely any mistakes will be made.
  • Remember that filing an extension does not extend the due date of your tax payment.  You're still required to pay your tax liability by April 17 in order to avoid penalties and interest.
  • If you are required to pay quarterly estimates, it is wise to include your current year first quarter payment with the extension payment.  Once the return is filed you can apply the overpayment to the current year, and the larger extension payment safeguards that you have enough paid in on time.

There are some compelling reasons why you should try to file earlier next year.

  1. Last-minute filers make more mistakes.
    1. Mistakes caught before April 17th aren't so much of a problem. 
    2. Since, however, you're a last-minute filer chances are any mistakes made on your return won't be caught before April 17th.  Mistakes caught after April 17 require an amended tax return to remedy them.
    3. Any mistakes that mean the filer owes more taxes than they already paid can lead to the IRS charging interest and penalties from the due date of the return until the full amount is paid. 
  2. Due to the pressure of getting everything in last-minute, late tax filers often miss out on deductions such as student loan interest, moving expenses, property taxes, noncash charitable contributions, etc.  Thus missing out on higher refunds or lower taxes owed.
  3. The sooner you file your return, the sooner you receive your refund. Who doesn’t want to have more money sooner rather than later?  More importantly, however, the sooner you get your refund, the sooner your refund is safe from identity theft.  The IRS blocked nearly 5 million suspicious returns in 2015 and in 2016 phishing and email-based scams had increased 400%.  

Maybe being best friends with your CPA isn't such a crazy idea after all?

Stay tuned after tax season, we'll be posting some tips on how to avoid last-minute filing next year so that this process can be at least a little less stressful hopefully. 

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Topics: Tax, Tax Return Extension

QuickBooks Tips | Going Mobile

Posted by Lauri A. Lisanti, CPA, MAcc, CPS, Certified QB ProAdvisor on Mar 26, 2018 2:38:08 PM

With the increased usage of smartphones and tablets, many clients ask if they can use QuickBooks on their mobile devices such as a smartphone and tablet. The answer is yes; however, it does depend on which version of QuickBooks the client is using.

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Topics: QuickBooks Expert, Quickbooks Tips

Social Security: Answers To 5 Common Questions

Posted by Derek M. Backa, CPA, CVA on Mar 12, 2018 4:26:17 PM

In 1935, Social Security was signed into law as part of President FDR's "New Deal" response to the Great Depression. This was the first time the Federal Government took responsibility for economic security of the old-aged, temporarily unemployed, children, and handicapped. Over 80 years later and social security has become an integral part of the retirement process.

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Topics: Social Security, Retirement

QuickBooks Tips | Transferring Data to Your Accountant

Posted by Lauri A. Lisanti, CPA, MAcc, CPS, Certified QB ProAdvisor on Feb 27, 2018 2:17:18 PM

What is the best way to send my accounting data to my accountant so that they can prepare my tax return?

The answer is not the same for every client. Clients often send a copy of their financial statements without realizing that it's insufficient. From the accountant’s perspective, it is much more efficient to have a copy of clients' QuickBooks file so that the information needed is right at their fingertips.

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Topics: Quickbooks Tips, QuickBooks Expert, Advice from a Certified QuickBooks Proadvisor

What is the difference between an audit and a review engagement?

Posted by Jenny H. Shao on Feb 12, 2018 3:50:43 PM

Nonprofits, construction companies, or companies with external investors are all examples of companies that may be required to get audits. However, these requirements may be dependent on certain circumstances. For instance, a nonprofit that recently reached a higher level of government funding may have crossed the audit requirement threshold. That said, there are many nuances involved in determining whether a switch to or from a review to an audit would be necessary. Regardless, companies do experience this transition and the following information is aimed at determining the difference between the two.

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Topics: Audit & Assurance, Audits Vs. Reviews

Tis the season for Giving | Deductible vs. Nondeductible Contributions and their limits.

Posted by Julia E. Backa, MSBM on Dec 18, 2017 8:31:00 PM

Not everyone thinks the holiday season is the most wonderful time of the year. The Huffington Post, CBS News, Harvard Medical School, HealthLine, etc. all have articles regarding the causes, and tips for coping with the holiday blues. Stress caused by finances, lack of time, and high expectations is mentioned as a frequent contributing factor. To cope a few sources recommend starting a new tradition involving volunteering and making charitable contributions. Perhaps this is because both volunteering and donating to charity have been found to increase happiness.

To do our part in spreading holiday cheer, we not only want to join the bandwagon in encouraging others to donate and volunteer, we want to help those that do, better understand the ins and outs of deductible vs. nondeductible contributions and the limitations on charitable contributions.

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Topics: Deductible Contributions, Charitable Contributions, Tax

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